Faculty

Paul Winchester, MA, MD

Paul Winchester, MA, MD

Phone: (317) 528-5595 (office)
Phone: (317) 332-9523 (cell)
Email: paul.winchester@franciscanalliance.org
Address:
8111 S. Emerson Avenue
Indianapolis IN  46237

Bio

Specialty

Perinatal and Neonatal Medicine - Board Certified
Pediatrics - Board Certified

Areas of Interest

Neonatology
Neonatal Fellowship
Epidemiology

Dr. Winchester is the Medical Director of the NICU at Franciscan St. Francis Health and Professor of Clinical Pediatrics at Riley Childrens Hospital in Indianapolis, Indiana. He provides clinical care to infants in a level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, attends high-risk deliveries, and provides pediatric clinical follow-up care. He also assists in clinical education of nurse practitioners, residents, and fellows. He is involved on several faculty and state health advisory committees. His community involvement includes Greenwood and Center Grove high school mentorship programs as well as mentoring premed students in research and clinical development.

Education

1970 B.A., Stanford Univeristy
1972 M.A., University of Michigan
1976 M.D., University of Colorado Medical Center
1977-1979 Internship and Residency-Pediatrics, University of Colorado Medical Center
1979-1981 Fellowship-Neonatology, Denver General Hospital/Univeristy of Colorado

Honors & Awards

1968 Outstanding Stanford Management Intern
1970 Graduate with Honors, Stanford University
1974-1975 Franklin P. Gengenbach Award for Best Pediatric Student
1991 March of Dimes "Make a Difference" Award
2005 Riley Hospital "Red Shoes" Award

Clinical

Riley Hospital for Children
Franciscan St. Francis Health


Research & Grants

Dr. Winchester's clinical research interests include factors that affect physiological maturation and epidemiology of birth defects, prematurity, gestational length, cognitive performance, and neonatal abstinence syndrome. His research has been presented at the Pediatric Academic Societies Meetings and has included benefits of prenatal steroids in less than 28 week gestation mothers, phenol based disinfectants associated with neonatal jaundice, increased risks of NEC related to cryptosporidium, blood transfusions, and adverse effects of prenatal exposure to pesticides. His work has been formed by fetal origins hypothesis and epigenetics as a mechanism of causing adult and transgenerational phenotypes. His work has received global recognition; and he contributes his knowledge through open collaboration and peer reviews. His research extends into the community with Greenwood High School investigating the herbicide effects on froglet development and behavior.


Representative PublicationsView All Publications

1. Free Carnitine Levels in Neonates with Fatty Acide Oxication Disorders (FAOD) PAS 2013, #751720 poster presentation, May 7, Washington D.C.

2. Neonatal Abstinence and Opiate Prescriptions PAS 2012 #755732 poster presentation, April 30, 2012, Boston MA

3. Fetal & Neonatal Factors Influencing Free Carnitine PAS 2012 #755307 poster presentation, April 28, 2012, Boston MA

4. Free Carnitine vs. Fetal Growth in Twins PAS 2012 #755654 poster presentation, April 28, 2012, Boston MA

5. Length of Gestation is Shortened by Pesticide Exposure PAS 2011 #753472 poster presentation, May 1, 2011, Denver CO

6. Maternal IQ Predicts Child’s Birth Weight PAS 2011 #754975 poster presentation, May 1, 2011, Denver CO

7. Drinking Water Atrazine and Other Contaminants and Infant Mortality in Illinois PAS 2011 #755009 poster presentation, May 1, 2011, Denver CO

8. Intrauterine Growth and Physiological Maturation in 30-33 Week Preterm Infants PAS 2010 #754762 poster presentation, May 4, 2010, Vancouver BC, Canada

9. Intrauterine Growth and Pesticide Exposure PAS 2010 #754963 poster presentation, May 4, 2010, Vancouver BC, Canada

10. Preterm birth risk versus season of conception. Are environmental contaminants contributing to adverse outcomes? PAS 2009 #753561, poster presentation May 6, 2009, Baltimore, MD.

11. Preterm Birth Rates and Pesiticide Usage in California PAS 2009 #753446 Platform presentation May 5, 2009, Baltimore, MD. (chosen for AAP media coverage)

12. Agrichemicals in surface water and birth defects in the United States. Acta Paediactrica, April 2009 issue.

13. County-Specific Birth Defect Rates and Pesticide Applications in the US. Presented Abstract (Publication 4035.6) at Pediatric Academic Societies and Asian Society for Pediatric Research, May 2008, Honolulu HA.

14. Incidence of Abdominal Wall Defects is Related to Surface Water Atrazine and Nitrate Levels. Journal of Pediatric Surgery (1531-5037) 2007 Jun;42(6):947-9.

15. The Association Between Scholastic Achievement Scores and Concentrations of Pesticides and Nitrates in Surface Water at the Time of Conception in Indiana. Abstract #751968 Platform Presentation at Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting, Toronto Canada, May 2007, Publication Number 7130.7

16. The Association of Monthly Preterm Birth Rates in the US with Concentrations of Nitrates and Pesticides in Surface Water. Abstract #751294 Platform Presentation at Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting, May 2007, Toronto Canada, Publication Number 7130.8

17. Birth Defects in the U.S. are Associated with Nitrate and Atrazine Exposure at the Time of Conception. Abstract Platform Presentation at Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting, April 2006, San Francisco CA.

18. Association Between Surface Water Nitrate Levels and Rates of Spina Bifida in Indiana. Abstract # 75222 presentation at Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting, May 2005, Washington D.C.

19. NICU Admission of Term Infants is Predicted by Fetal Monitor Abnormalities in Early Active Phases of Labor. Abstract #2165 at Society for Pediatric Research, May 2003. 20 .Delivery of Extremely Premature Infants Is Predicted by Maternal Triage in Labor and Delivery. Opportunities for Improved Rate of Betamethasone Treatment. Abstract #2156 at Society for Pediatric Research, May 2003.