Faculty

Todd D. Nebesio, MD, FAAP

Todd D. Nebesio, MD, FAAP

Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics

Phone: (317) 944-3889
Fax: (317) 944-3882
Email: tdnebesi@iu.edu
Address:
705 Riley Hospital Drive, Room 5960
Indianapolis, IN  46202

Bio

Specialty

Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology

Areas of Interest

Type 1 diabetes, thyroid disease, adrenal disease, disorders of growth and puberty.

Dr. Nebesio grew up in Atlanta, Georgia.  He attended Wake Forest University for his undergraduate education.  He completed medical school, pediatric residency, and Pediatric Endocrinology fellowship at Indiana University School of Medicine.  He enjoys all areas of pediatric endocrinology, and he has a special interest in thyroid disease, adrenal disorders, and type 1 diabetes.  He has been the investigator in a study of children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) as well as various industry sponsored studies.

Education

1996 BS, Wake Forest University
2000 MD, Indiana University School of Medicine
2003 Pediatric residency, Indiana University School of Medicine
2006 Pediatric endocrinology fellowship, Indiana University School of Medicine

Honors & Awards

2003 Alpha Omega Alpha
2003 Andrew Jones Memorial Teaching Award
2006 Jack Metcoff Award from Midwest Society for Pediatric Research

Clinical

Riley Hospital Outpatient Center
MSA3
705 Riley Hospital Drive
Indianapolis, IN  46202

Riley Children's Specialty Clinic
11590 North Meridian Street
Suite 300
Carmel, IN 46032

South Bend Pediatrics
211 North Eddy Street
South Bend, IN 46617

Deaconess Riley Children's Specialty Center
4133 Gateway Boulevard
Suite 220
Newburgh, IN 47630 


Research & Grants



Representative PublicationsView All Publications

1. Nebesio TD, Siddiqui AR, Pescovitz OH, Eugster EA. Time-course to hypothyroidism after fixed-dose radioablation therapy of Graves’ disease in children. J Pediatr 2002; 141: 99-103.

2. Nebesio TD, Kreher NC, Hannon TS. Infant with classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) born to a mother with classic CAH. J Pediatr 2004; 145: 250-252.

3. Nebesio TD, Pescovitz OH. Historical perspectives: Endocrine disruptors and the timing of puberty. The Endocrinologist 2005; 15: 44-48.

4. Nebesio TD, Davis MM, Billmire DF, Eugster EA. Giant cell fibroblastoma masquerading as prepubertal gynecomastia. Clin Pediatr 2005; 44: 355-358.

5. Nebesio TD, Eugster EA. Antithyroid drugs. N Engl J Med 2005; 352: 2246-2247.

6. Golomb MR, Biller J, Smith JL, Edwards-Brown M, Sanchez JC, Nebesio TD, Garg BP. A 10-year old girl with coexistent moyamoya disease and Graves’ disease. J Child Neurol 2005; 20: 620-624.

7. Nebesio TD, Eugster EA. Pubic hair of infancy: endocrinopathy or enigma? Pediatrics 2006; 117: 951-954.

8. Wu X, Estwick SA, Chen S, Yu M, Ming W, Nebesio TD, Li Y, Yuan J, Kapur R, Ingram D, Yoder MC, Yang FC. Neurofibromin plays a critical role in modulating osteoblast differentiation of mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells. Hum Mol Genet 2006; 15: 2837-2845.

9. Yang FC, Chen S, Robling A, Yu X, Nebesio TD, Morgan TL, Li X, Yuan J, Hock J, Ingram DA, Clapp DW. Hyperactivation of p21ras and PI3-K cooperate to alter murine and human neurofibromatosis type 1-haploinsufficient osteoclast functions. J Clin Invest 2006; 116: 2880-2891.

10. Nebesio TD, Eugster EA. Observation of hypertension in children with 21-hydroxylase deficiency: a preliminary report. Endocrine 2006; 30: 279-282.

11. Nebesio TD, Ming W, Chen S, Clegg T, Yuan J, Yang Y, Estwick SA, Li Y, Li X, Hingtgen CM, Yang FC. Neurofibromin-deficient Schwann cells have increased lysophosphatidic acid dependent survival and migration – implications for increased neurofibroma formation during pregnancy. Glia 2007; 55: 527-536.

12. Nebesio TD, Hoover WC, Caldwell RL, Nitu ME, Eugster EA. Development of pulmonary hypertension in an infant treated with diazoxide. J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab 2007; 20: 939-944.

13. Nebesio TD, Shankar RR. Hyperpigmentation in only one identical twin. J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab 2008; 21: 7.

14. Nebesio TD, Eugster EA. Unusual thyroid constellation in Down syndrome: congenital hypothyroidism, Graves’ disease, and hemiagenesis in the same child. J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab 2009; 22: 263-268.

15. Nebesio TD, Eugster EA. Routine renal ultrasounds in children with congenital hypothyroidism: a premature conclusion? J Pediatr 2009; 155: 455.

16. Lee PA, Fuqua JS, Nebesio TD. Treatment and outcome of congenital adrenal hyperplasia: 21-hydroxylase deficiency. Int J Pediatr Endocrinol 2010; 2010: 276843. Epub 2011 Mar 2011.

17. Nebesio TD, Eugster EA. Growth and reproductive outcomes in congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Int J Pediatr Endocrinol 2010; 2010:298937. Epub 2010 Feb 1.

18. Nebesio TD, McKenna MP, Nabhan ZM, Eugster EA. Newborn screening results in children with central hypothyroidism. J Pediatr 2010; 156: 990-993.

19. Nebesio TD, Eugster EA. Images in clinical medicine – Delayed Graves’ ophthalmopathy. N Engl J Med 2010, May 6; 362(18): e60.

20. Nebesio TD, Chen S, Yang FC. What accounts for the variable responses to progesterone on Schwann cells from mice and humans - the species-specific influenece or the paracrine effects from the tumor microenvironment? Cancer Biol Ther 2010, Dec 1: 10(1): 1077-1078.